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Testing Farm

Testing Farm is Packit's testing system. Test execution is managed by tmt tool.

Enable Testing

In order to enable test execution simply include tests and required copr_build jobs in the .packit.yaml configuration:

jobs:
- job: copr_build
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all

- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all

The test job by default requires Copr build to be built before running tests, and then it is installed into the testing environment.

If you want to run tests without a Copr build, the test job needs to include skip_build (described below) option in the job configuration:

  jobs:
- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all
skip_build: true

If you want to run multiple tests jobs for the same trigger with different configurations, you need to specify the identifier options (see Optional parameters below):

jobs:
- job: copr_build
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all

- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
identifier: first
targets:
- fedora-rawhide

- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
identifier: second
targets:
- fedora-latest-stable

If you want to trigger tests via pull request comment and not by every new commit into the pull request, the test job needs to include manual_trigger (described below) option in the job configuration:

  jobs:
- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all
skip_build: true
manual_trigger: true
info

If you have both build and follow-up test jobs with manual_trigger: true, you will need to post 2 comments: first /packit build comment command and after the builds are successful /packit test comment command.

Another useful config is labels option:

  jobs:
- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all
skip_build: true
manual_trigger: true
identifier: regression-upgrade
labels:
- upgrade
- regression

- job: tests
trigger: pull_request
targets:
- fedora-all
skip_build: true
manual_trigger: true
identifier: upgrade
labels:
- regression

For more info see Running group of tests with same label

Required parameters

  • targets - Specify which "builds" you want to test. As with copr_build job you can use specific targets such as fedora-34-x86_64. Or just the distro part, like centos-stream-8, in which case the architecture is x86_64.

You can also use the aliases provided by Packit to not need to change the config file when the new system version is released.

Each target is then mapped to a (tmt) distro and to a Testing farm's compose when submitting a test. You can override the default (target to distro) mapping by specifying targets as a dictionary instead of as a list (make sure to include the architecture of the target, e.g. not epel-8 but epel-8-x86_64).

In the following example, the epel-8-x86_64 build will be tested on centos-8 distro (otherwise the default would be centos-stream-8) and for epel-7-x86_64 build the default mapping (to centos-7 distro) will be used:

  targets:
epel-8-x86_64:
distros: [centos-8]
epel-7-x86_64: {}

Optional parameters

  • fmf_url - Git repository containing the metadata (FMF) tree. Use any format acceptable by the git clone command.
  • fmf_ref - Branch, tag or commit specifying the desired git revision. Defaults to "master" when fmf_url is specified and fmf_ref is not.
  • fmf_path - Path to the fmf root (the parent path where .fmf folder is located) relative to the git root. Defaults to . (git root).
  • tmt_plan - Run plans by the given name. Can be passed as a regular expression.
  • tf_post_install_script - Bash script as a string to run during the guest provisioning.
  • tf_extra_params - a free-form dictionary that allows specifying extra parameters to the Testing Farm. For a complete list of parameters, refer to the Testing Farm documentation. The dictionary must follow the structure of the Testing Farm request. Options specified in the dictionary have the highest precedence, i.e. can override Packit's defaults. They are being merged with the Packit's values, the only exception is the artifacts list, which is combined with the artifact passed by Packit. Also, beware of indentation-sensitivity of the YAML format. You can verify that the option is processed correctly using a YAML parser. Refer to the configuration examples for more information.
  • skip_build - Whether to skip the build phase and only run tests (defaults to false). Enabling this will cause no Copr build to be built and installed into the testing environment, only submitting request to Testing Farm (the selected components to be installed should be part of the TMT definitions).
  • env - A dictionary you can use to set any environment variable that will be available in the Testing Farm environment where the tests are run.
  • identifier – Suffix added to the name of a GitHub check run. This is needed when you have multiple tests jobs with different configuration. For example if you set this to e2e-tests, then a check run for Rawhide would be named testing-farm:fedora-rawhide-x86_64:e2e-tests.
  • manual_trigger - Whether to trigger Testing Farm jobs only manually (via pull request comment /packit test (/packit-stg test for staging instance) or rerunning the check in the GitHub UI) or not (defaults to false).
  • labels - List of labels that group several jobs together. Users then use them when manually triggering the jobs like /packit test --labels regression,upgrade.
  • use_internal_tf - Whether to use the internal Testing Farm infrastructure (defaults to false). This requires additional approval from our side (please, contact us in case you want to use it).

There are also environment variables set by Packit:

  • PACKIT_FULL_REPO_NAME
  • PACKIT_UPSTREAM_NAME
  • PACKIT_UPSTREAM_URL
  • PACKIT_DOWNSTREAM_NAME
  • PACKIT_DOWNSTREAM_URL
  • PACKIT_PACKAGE_NAME
  • PACKIT_PACKAGE_NVR
  • PACKIT_BUILD_LOG_URL
  • PACKIT_SRPM_URL
  • PACKIT_COMMIT_SHA
  • PACKIT_COPR_PROJECT, e.g. packit/packit-releases
  • PACKIT_COPR_RPMS, space-separated list of RPMs that were built in Copr

And there are also pairs of variables for pull-request jobs:

  • PACKIT_SOURCE_SHA and PACKIT_TARGET_SHA
  • PACKIT_SOURCE_BRANCH and PACKIT_TARGET_BRANCH
  • PACKIT_SOURCE_URL and PACKIT_TARGET_URL

Note that some variables do not need to be set if the value is unknown, irrelevant or not-configured.

Restart Testing

The testing will automatically start after an update to the pull request (and successful Copr build if skip_build is false). To trigger retesting manually (can come handy in case of infrastructure issues for example), you can use the following comment in the pull request:

/packit test

Or if you want to re-trigger only failed tests, you can use the following comment in the pull request:

/packit retest-failed

Running tests with builds from another pull request

It is also possible to run the tests with Copr builds built by Packit in another pull request (in a different repository). This can be useful when you are working on a change that spans multiple projects and needs to be tested together. These tests are possible to trigger only via a comment containing the argument specifying the pull request as:

/packit test <namespace>/<repo>#<pr_id>

The requirement is that in the specified PR, there were recent successful builds created by Packit for the targets configured in the repository with the "main" pull request. This is a new feature, so the behaviour may be adjusted in the future. Please reach out back to us for help or with your suggestions.

Running tests with a specific identifier

It is possible to run a specific job via /packit test command. The user just needs to specify the argument --identifier <job_identifier> and Packit will trigger only the job with this identifier. The whole command should look like this: /packit test --identifier my-job-id. You can also configure test_command.default_identifier to allow commonly used jobs to be triggered without the need for manual specification.

Running a group of tests with the same label

Users can trigger a specific group of jobs that has a specific value in the list of labels option. The command to pick up these jobs is /packit test --labels regression,upgrade where either regression or upgrade must be present in labels option for the job. The labels should be in the format of comma-separated string. You can also configure test_command.default_labels to allow commonly used job combinations to be triggered without the need for manual specification.

Creating Tests

The easiest way to get started with defining tests is to use the tmt tool which will help you with the setup. Please follow tmt's guide to get started.

Example test structure

Once your project is initialized, this is how your structure can look like:

$ tmt
Found 3 tests: /tests/full, /tests/smoke and /tests_recording.
Found 4 plans: /plans/full, /plans/rpmlint, /plans/session-recording and /plans/smoke.
Found 0 stories.

$ ls -1 plans/
full.fmf
main.fmf
rpmlint.fmf
session-recording.fmf
smoke.fmf

More Examples

Get inspiration for a quick start from a couple of real-life examples! These samples live in .fmf files inside tests or plans directories. You can also have a look at tmt examples site.

Using Filters

Use a custom filter in the discover step in order to choose relevant tests only:

discover:
how: fmf
filter: "tier: 1"
url: https://src.fedoraproject.org/tests/selinux

Prepare Step

The prepare step can be used to define how test environment should be prepared before testing. Provide one or more paths to ansible playbooks:

prepare:
how: ansible
playbook:
- setup/packages.yml

Apache Test

Here is an example of a simple integration test for the web server httpd and curl utility:

execute:
script:
- dnf -y install httpd curl
- systemctl start httpd
- echo foo > /var/www/html/index.html
- curl http://localhost/ | grep foo

The plan above defines only the execute step. Individual shell commands are provided as a list. Testing will fail if any of the commands returns a non-zero exit status.

Systemd Tests

Below you can find a bit more interesting example of a systemd test configuration:

summary:
Basic set of quick smoke tests for systemd.
discover:
how: fmf
filter: "tier: 1 & distro: rhel-8"
url: "https://github.com/systemd-rhel/tests"
prepare:
how: ansible
playbook: [setup/packages.yml]
execute:
how: tmt

This plan enables a set of Tier 1 tests from the shared systemd tests repository. The meaning of individual attributes is as follows:

  • summary — an optional but useful attribute describing high-level purpose of the plan.
  • discover — instructs to fetch tests from given repository and select relevant ones by provided filter.
  • prepare — specifies which ansible playbook should be applied to prepare environment for testing.
  • execute — defines that the tmt should be used for running the tests.

FMF Tests

Here's a real-life example of tests enabled for the fmf package. There are several plans defined under the plans directory. The smoke plan enables a super basic test checking availability of the fmf command:

summary:
Just a basic smoke test
execute:
script: fmf --help

Plan features is used to execute all available beakerlib tests from the fmf repository:

summary:
Essential command line features
discover:
how: fmf
url: https://github.com/psss/fmf
execute:
how: tmt

It is also possible to select only a subset of available tests. This is demonstrated by the docs plan. Use an fmf filter like tier:1 to select tests for execution. You can also reference a specific feature area instead:

summary:
Ensure that documentation is present
discover:
how: fmf
url: https://github.com/psss/fmf
filter: coverage:/stories/docs.*
execute:
how: tmt

See the stories directory to get some inspiration for organizing stories and requirements.

Running linters

Running linters on your code is easy to set up using Testing Farm and tmt. Linters are tools which you can install from the distribution, and they usually just require a path to files which they check. Here is a plan which you can use to run rpmlint on your spec file.

rpmlint

We are checking our spec files with rpmlint in our project:

summary:
Execute rpmlint on the spec file
discover:
how: shell
tests:
- name: rpmlint
test: rpmlint packit.spec
prepare:
- name: packages
how: install
package:
- rpmlint
execute:
how: tmt

rpminspect

rpminspect can analyze your packages and give you information related to licensing, metadata, manpages, desktop app metadata, file ownership & permissions and much much more.

Here's a tmt plan you can use to have rpminspect invoked on SRPMs and binary RPMs built in Copr (these are available by Testing Farm in /var/share/test-artifacts):

summary:
Check rpm files with rpminspect
discover:
how: shell
tests:
- name: rpminspect SRPM and RPMs
test: for rpm in /var/share/test-artifacts/*.rpm; do rpminspect-fedora -E metadata $rpm; done
prepare:
- name: packages
how: install
package:
- rpminspect
- rpminspect-data-fedora
execute:
how: tmt
adjust:
enabled: false
when: distro == centos-stream-9

You can run rpminspect also using the CentOS Stream configuration (see also the adjust section in the snippets). This should prepare you before opening CentOS Stream dist-git MRs:

summary:
Check rpm files with rpminspect
discover:
how: shell
tests:
- name: rpminspect SRPM and RPMs
test: for rpm in /var/share/test-artifacts/*.rpm; do rpminspect-centos -E metadata -v -t VERIFY --profile=centos-stream-9-devel $rpm; done
prepare:
- name: packages
how: install
package:
- rpminspect
- rpminspect-data-centos
execute:
how: tmt
adjust:
enabled: false
when: distro == fedora

As these plans rely on the Testing Farm environment (downloaded RPMs), they are not reproducible manually, but you can reproduce them via tmt-reproducer.sh provided by Testing Farm.

Since rpminspect is under active development, you should consider installing the latest version from this Copr project: https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/coprs/dcantrell/rpminspect/

csmock

You can not only run linters on your SRPM file but also run static/dynamic analysis using csmock.

Here is a test definition of the check: (The result manipulation is here to be able to see the html report directly on the Testing Farm Result page.)

summary:
Check SRPM files with csmock
discover:
how: shell
tests:
- name: csmock
test: "csmock --all-tools /tmp/*.src.rpm -o $TMT_TEST_DATA --force && echo -e '- result: pass' > $TMT_TEST_DATA/results.yaml || echo -e '- result: fail' > $TMT_TEST_DATA/results.yaml ; echo -e ' name: /\n log:\n - scan.log\n - scan-results.html' >> $TMT_TEST_DATA/results.yaml"
result: custom
require: bash
prepare:
- name: packages
how: install
package:
- csmock
- how: shell
script: cd /tmp && curl -O ${PACKIT_SRPM_URL}
execute:
how: tmt

Testing Farm API

Packit Service communicates with Testing Farm via its API.

Issues & RFEs

If you have found an issue or have an RFE, you can file an issue in nucleus project.